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Tropical Storm Fay lashed the New Jersey shore, on a path to soak the New York City region


Rain lashed the New Jersey shore Friday as the fast-moving Tropical Storm Fay churned north on a path anticipated to soak the New York City region.

The storm system was anticipated to deliver 2 to four inches (5 to 10 centimeters) of rain, with the risk of flash flooding in elements of the mid-Atlantic and southern New England, The U.S. National Hurricane Center stated in its 11 a.m. advisory. That’s down from earlier forecasts of about 3 to 5 inches (8 to 13 centimeters) of rain.

A tropical storm warning remained in impact from Fenwick Island, Delaware, to Watch Hill, Rhode Island. The warning space contains Long Island and the Long Island Sound in New York, forecasters stated. The middle of the storm remained off the mid-Atlantic Coast on Friday morning.

President Donald Trump stated the storm is being monitored and that the Federal Emergency Management Agency was poised to assist if wanted.

“We’re fully prepared. FEMA’s ready in case it’s bad. Shouldn’t be too bad, but you never know,” Trump informed reporters whereas departing the White House for Florida. “But at this moment … it’s looking like it’s going to be hitting New Jersey fairly soon. And we are fully prepared.”

The storm picked up velocity Friday morning, shifting north round 12 mph (19kph) and producing high sustained winds of 60 mph (97 kph), forecasters stated. Earlier observations confirmed it shifting at Eight mph (13 kph) with high sustained winds of 45 mph (75 kph).

This GOES-16 satellite tv for pc picture taken at 9:30 UTC (5:30 a.m. EDT) on Friday, July 10, 2020 exhibits Tropical Storm Fay because it strikes nearer to land in the northeast of the United States. Fay was anticipated to deliver 2 to four inches (5 to 10 centimeters) of rain, with the risk of flash flooding in elements of the mid-Atlantic and southern New England, The U.S. National Hurricane Center stated in its 5 a.m. advisory.

NOAA | AP

Fay is the earliest sixth-named storm on file, in accordance to Colorado State University hurricane researcher Phil Klotzbach. The earlier file was Franklin on July 22, 2005, Klotzbach tweeted.

Two named storms shaped earlier than the official June 1 begin of the hurricane season. None of this season’s earlier 5 named storms strengthened into hurricanes.



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