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Global coronavirus cases hit 40 million as second wave gathers pace


Doctors in Berlin, Germany.

Sean Gallup | Getty Images News | Getty Images

LONDON — The variety of reported coronavirus cases world wide has hit 40 million, based on a tally saved by Johns Hopkins University.

The grim milestone of 40,050,902 confirmed cases on Monday comes as varied components of Europe and the U.S. battle to cope with an alarming surge in infections.

The dreaded “second wave” started in August in Europe, following the relief of nationwide lockdowns carried out in spring.

European governments have scrambled to comprise a surge in cases by re-introducing a raft of restrictive measures on public life and the hospitality sector, together with the closure or restricted opening of pubs, bars and eating places, proscribing social gatherings and even resorting to curfews, now seen in a handful of main French cities, together with Paris.

The WHO warned on Friday that Europe‘s coronavirus outbreak is “concerning” as the variety of obtainable intensive care beds continues to dwindle and close to capability in some areas.

When adjusting for inhabitants, the variety of new coronavirus infections in Europe has now overtaken that within the U.S., with Europe reporting 187 new Covid-19 cases per million individuals, based mostly on a seven-day common, in contrast with 162 new Covid-19 cases per million individuals within the U.S.

The World Health Organization’s personal information places the variety of cases at 39.8 million, with 18,709,984 within the Americas, 8,489,775 in Southeast Asia and simply over 7,889,000 cases in Europe, whereas Africa has seen simply over 1,259,000 cases.

—CNBC’s Berkeley Lovelace Jr. contributed to this text.



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