in

FTC asks five e-cigarette companies, including Juul, to turn over more sales and advertising data


Nick Gregory, a 26-year-old supervisor, vapes on a JUUL at Botany Bay in Lexington, Ky.

Charles Bertram | Tribune News Service | Getty Images

The Federal Trade Commission stated Monday that it requested five e-cigarette makers present the company with sales and advertising data for 2019 and 2020.

The corporations cited by the FTC have been Juul, R.J. Reynolds Vapor Co., Fontem, Logic Technology Development and NJOY.

In October 2019, the FTC requested the e-cigarette makers to present comparable advertising and marketing data from 2015 to 2018. The FTC is inspecting annual sales data, product flavors, giveaways, social media, school campus packages, and influencer and affiliate packages.

E-cigarette maker Juul has beforehand been beneath the highlight for its advertising and marketing practices, particularly towards youth. Early final 12 months, 39 states investigated the corporate’s advertising and marketing and sales techniques amid lawsuits from youngsters who declare to have grown addicted to Juul’s merchandise. In 2019, the FDA criticized the corporate for illegally advertising and marketing its vapes as safer options to cigarettes.

At the top of 2019, Juul introduced it will stop all product advertising in broadcast, print and digital channels within the U.S.

Juul, R.J. Reynolds Vapor Company and NJOY didn’t instantly reply to CNBC’s requests for remark. Logic Technology Development couldn’t be reached for remark.

“We have been working with the FTC on our response and look forward to sharing it with them on or before the deadline,” stated Kelly Cushman, a spokeswoman for Fontem’s mum or dad ITG Brands, in an electronic mail.



Source hyperlink

What do you think?

Written by Business Boy

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading…

0

Satellite data company Spire goes public via SPAC, adding to a growing list of public space plays

The Oscars should heed these 5 lessons from the Golden Globes and Emmys